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RYAN LEE
515 W 26th St 3fl, New York, NY 10001
212-397-0742
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RLWindow - ONTOPO : ¿Hablas Turista?
May 15-Aug 15 2019 - 87 days left
RYAN LEE is pleased to announce ONTOPO : ¿Hablas Turista? organized by Jon Santos with sitespecific photographic window installations by Priscilla Jeong, Kamau Patton, and Amy Yao from May 15 to August 15. Performances by Keetin Mayakara, Juri Onuki, and Kamau Patton will take place during the opening reception and in the gallery space. The project is site responsive to RLWindow designed to engage High Line visitors and tourists through architecture, performance, and participation. The RLWindow can be viewed on the High Line at 26th Street overlooking the gallery. ONTOPO is an on-going series of performative and participatory projects based on collective creative exchange. The project reimagines the relationship between creating and consuming, author and audience, with a multi-faceted embrace of visual art, cuisine, design, sound, architecture, and performance. project’s core is the willingness to experiment and the collective energy of contributing artists from different regions. Each site creates freedom from familiar constraints allowing for more present participation among artists and audience. ONTOPO : ¿Hablas Turista? meaning “Do You Speak Tourist?” references a project Priscilla Jeong and Amy Yao created in Tulum, Mexico. They spontaneously assembled for recreation, contemplation, rest, artistic production, and performance. In this context, the artists’ surroundings and their temporary community informed the works. The artists reconsider their voices and modes of production outside their studio within the dynamic context of localism and tourism. Juri Onuki and Kamau Patton participated in the Magick City and Catskills Zen Do ONTOPO projects respectively. Collectively the artists’ experiences and works fold into the RLWindow site and project series.
George Miyasaki | Abstract Expressionist California: Paintings and Lithographs, 1955-61
May 16-Jun 15 2019 - 26 days left
RYAN LEE is pleased to announce George Miyasaki (1935-2013), Abstract Expressionist California: Paintings and Lithographs, 1955-1961. This is RYAN LEE’s first presentation of Miyasaki’s work since announcing the representation of his estate last December. The exhibition will feature a selection of Miyasaki’s acclaimed early abstractions, many of which have never before been shown. Miyasaki was born in rural Hawaii to Japanese parents and grew up under martial law during World War II. In 1953 he moved to Oakland, California to study with Richard Diebenkorn and Nathan Oliveira at the California College of Arts & Crafts. Working in both painting and printmaking, Miyasaki cultivated a Bay Area-inflected brand of abstract expressionism. Drawing inspiration from nature, particularly the western landscape, paintings like Coastline (1960) use a pale palette of gray-blues, sea green, rose, and a few dabs of yellow to convey a foggy seascape with subdued hues that are tempered by its thickly painted surface. This balanced execution of harmony and dissonance is also characteristic of Terrain #2 (1958) and Horizon #2 (1959), both of which demonstrate Miyasaki’s gestural application of controlled color.
Anne-Karin Furunes : Together but Apart
Jun 19-Aug 09 2019 - 81 days left
RYAN LEE is pleased to announce Together but Apart, an exhibition of new work by Anne-Karin Furunes. The exhibition will shed light on the increasingly urgent threat of climate change, particularly as the inhabitants of Fennoscandia, the Sápmi people, experience it. Together but Apart includes a selection of portraits, landscapes, and monumental paintings rendered in Furunes’s signature technique of perforated painted canvas. Furunes’ imagery is drawn from photographs housed at the Polar Archive at the Norwegian Polar Institute in Tromsö as well as the Sophus Tromholt Collection at the University of Bergen Library—a world-famous archive of nineteenth-century images of the Sápmi people taken during the first scientific expedition to study the Northern Lights. Though her paintings appear photographic, they are created entirely by hand through a process of meticulous perforation that mimics the looks of halftone printing. Furunes begins with a monochrome canvas. She then translates the photographic image to canvas by creating a constellation of perforated holes in varying sizes that allow for the passage of variable amounts of light. She alters each image to suit her vision, sometimes modifying the tone, perspective, and framing. Like photography, Furunes generates permanent images via the effects of light on a surface, though here the light remains unfixed and in constant dialogue with the surrounding environment.